Japanese Sawhorse Redux

It’s been a long time in the making but I finally finished the second Japanese sawhorse with the idea of having a traditional and portable workbench. In the nicer months I work in the garage which is where the power tools live but during the lovely Iowa winters I relocate to the basement and after spending one season down there, a Japanese style bench seemed like a great addition to the work space. For the bench top itself I acquired a 8/4, 12″ wide, 8′ long, Ash slab (I would have preferred a 12/4 piece for stabilization but the one I have is pretty massive all the same). I’ve got some planing yet to do on the slab and I intend to add two sliding dovetail keys to act as ventral stops. For planing stops on the dorsal side I’ll drill a couple holes and use bench dogs. Here’s the photo essay of the sawhorse build. And the design, etc. is all based off of Jay Van Arsdale’s piece in American Woodworker magazine.

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4 thoughts on “Japanese Sawhorse Redux

  1. Excellent job…very similar to the ones I teach in a workshop…wonderful

  2. Thanks for sharing! I’m planning a similar build, curios if you can comment in the stability of the slab for planning? Do the legs move around under moderate planing?

    • Hi Siavosh, thanks for looking. the setup is really quite stable. To make it even more so, I plan on adding two dovetail stops on the bottom of the slab to prevent it from sliding but otherwise it works fine.
      -Bobby

    • Hi Siavosh,

      As a Timberwright we have “massive” weight placed on ours and never really notice the wood stock move very much. For lighter stock, we just place a “bridging board” between the to trestle and this also functions as a table for tools.

      Regards,

      j

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